You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Boston’ tag.


I love to take photos in art museums (almost as much as I love to eat lunch in them!). The atmosphere, architecture, people, and of course the art provide a splendid background for photography.

Sometimes I find the art lovers augment to works of art in a thrilling way. They posture, gesture and stare in ways that is often subconsciously consistent and/or complimentary with the art. They extend it or comment silently on it or create a new piece simply by being there.

Here are some examples of my art museum photos (I’ll post more after a while):

Lobby, Brooklyn Museum

The image above is simply a shot of the lobby in the Brooklyn Museum. It makes a great architectural image because it is a beautiful space.

Phoning Motherwell

This is one of my favorites from museums. I call it Phoning Motherwell — that’s Robert Motherwell’s Elegy to The Spanish Republic # 108 the art lovers are studying. In their intensity and body language they have created another work for my camera to collect.

A Kline, A Pollock and A Sculpture

The one above is less striking but the person has almost become another sculpture, a taller, more slender person in black would have worked as well or better. (If anyone knows the identity of the sculpture please let me know)

Reflections in MOMA

This has architectural elements but also attempts to capture some of the atmosphere — the spirit of the New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Did I succeed?

Advertisements


Aurora and I went to see and hear Sonny Rollins at Symphony Hall in Boston on Sunday the 18th of April. He will have completed his 80th year this fall so this was billed as an early 80th birthday party. Man he wailed! Played non-stop for 90 minutes. He is the only horn in his group — the band included Bobby Broom on guitar, Bob Cranshaw on bass, Kobie Watkins on drums and Victor See-Yuen on congas. Its a great ensemble but the show was 95% Sunny. He played six long numbers, constantly improvising. He started out playing “Patanjali,” a three note anthem and he repeated the notes several times, then improvised, then went back to the notes. Powerfully. Clearly. Sounding out the notion that Sonny had come to play.

And play he did. You can read about it in this Review in the Boston Phoenix

The setting for jazz at Symphony Hall is challenging. There is only one musician’s name above the stage : Beethoven. But I think if he was looking down it was with admiration.

The crowd had people who looked to be about eight years old and those who might have been ninety. Sonny was elegant, dressed in white and just slightly stooped showing his age a bit. But his music and creativity never did. There was no encore but Sonny did promise to return to Boston “soon, real soon.” We hope he keeps his promise.


 

obeysmica-artsy1First of all Shepard Fairey’s exhibit at the ICA Boston is stunning visually, impressive politically and I want to see it again. Fairey is an artist of the streets who made it to the legit museum and gallery world. He  graphically shows us how confused we are. Guns and roses, life and death, love and hate  etc.

His arrest  on the way to his own opening over an old graffiti rap was stupid and put Boston in a bad light. The local cops apparently didn’t know that their acions would be picked up around the world and that they would seem odd to most people who care about art. Sure private property needs to be protected but Fairey’s deal is that he can appropriate private property, use it to communicate his own, highly worthwhile message and he seems to expect to usually get away with it (“art is what you can get away with” saith the Warhol).

Well, I get it. His street work is clever and intriguing so I guess if he doesn’t tag my house I’m ok with his methods ;>) Or to put it another way, urban public spaces are usually enhanced by graffiti of this caliber. I guess. Its a matter of taste and will always be controversial. 

Yeah but wait a minute — something strange happened on my way to the museum — Because I asked I was told that no photography of Shepard Fairey’s work would be permitted. In other words I couldn’t appropriate his stuff for, say my blog or even just to show my friends. Yet the brochure handed out at he museum said — “Know the words” — and the first word is “Appropriate!” Yep, that’s what Shepard does, but he doesn’t want any appropriations of his stuff. Is that fair or or does it even make sense?

So I only took one sneaky photo (see below). Also took some legit ones of the building and surroundings – shots of the architecture are ok according to the young man in black who sold us our tickets. (He was in black so he must be hip..)

ica-architecture

fairey-approriated1

It would be ironic to be arrested or kicked out for taking photos of Shepard Fairey’s work (which mostly have appropriated photos and other stuff in them) — know what I mean? What do you think?

(BTW — I pulled the ‘Obey’ tag from a random place on the internet. It is available world wide for your appropriation and delight!)

Use of photos

Photos on this blog are copyright protected. Therefore, if you wish to use photos please make a donation in an amount of your choice. My PayPal email address is fwinters@verizon.net.

Prints are available at Fine Art America

Or contact me directly.

Thanks.

Blog Stats

  • 296,287 hits

Categories Dropdown

Advertisements