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I love to take photos in art museums (almost as much as I love to eat lunch in them!). The atmosphere, architecture, people, and of course the art provide a splendid background for photography.

Sometimes I find the art lovers augment to works of art in a thrilling way. They posture, gesture and stare in ways that is often subconsciously consistent and/or complimentary with the art. They extend it or comment silently on it or create a new piece simply by being there.

Here are some examples of my art museum photos (I’ll post more after a while):

Lobby, Brooklyn Museum

The image above is simply a shot of the lobby in the Brooklyn Museum. It makes a great architectural image because it is a beautiful space.

Phoning Motherwell

This is one of my favorites from museums. I call it Phoning Motherwell — that’s Robert Motherwell’s Elegy to The Spanish Republic # 108 the art lovers are studying. In their intensity and body language they have created another work for my camera to collect.

A Kline, A Pollock and A Sculpture

The one above is less striking but the person has almost become another sculpture, a taller, more slender person in black would have worked as well or better. (If anyone knows the identity of the sculpture please let me know)

Reflections in MOMA

This has architectural elements but also attempts to capture some of the atmosphere — the spirit of the New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Did I succeed?

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Seen at the Museum of Modern Art

Lee Lozano was discovered by me at the MOMA last week. I was there with my daughter Maria and we wanted to see the huge de Kooning exhibit — which we did and enjoyed muchly.

And I was intrigued by this Lee Lozano piece — musings about form and content. Mathematical and Escher/Godel like it causes the brain to light up a bit. In case you can’t read it, here is what it says:

“I can’t be interested in form for form’s sake. Form is like mathematics: a model which might be applied to various sets of data. Form is seductive: form can be perfect.

But there’s no justification for form (in the experiments and investigations) unless its used to expose content which has meaning. The result of an experiment is the meaningful content.

Information is content. Content is fictional. Content is messy, like the universe its unfinished and furthermore it becomes obsolete so quickly when multiplied by time.

Form is reduplicable, content is not reduplicable.

Fiction has meaning but only in a given instant of time.”

Is form then the structure that we live in? We create messy, impermanent content information and it is fiction. Perhaps because it is impermanent? Fiction/content has meaning but briefly. Form is perhaps eternal.

Powerful, useful thoughts distilled into an 8 by 10 inch sheet of paper and hung in MOMA — I’m glad I saw it there on my visit with Maria.

Use of photos

Photos on this blog are copyright protected. Therefore, if you wish to use photos please make a donation in an amount of your choice. My PayPal email address is fwinters@verizon.net.

Prints are available at Fine Art America

Or contact me directly.

Thanks.

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