You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘grafitti’ category.


How? No idea. Just wow!.

Isn’t this great? Love it!

Advertisements

Here are some examples of street art that I found in Brooklyn and Manhattan over the last few years. Some of it is true graffiti — just young people writing on walls — other examples were done by groups to commemorate something. But anyway — I love to come across street art (don’t like tagging tho — just scribbled initials usually).

Here ya go – let me know what you think.

Old Glory and Lady Liberty

These ladies are of Russian origin I think -- as are many in this neighborhood.

Roebling Tea Room in Williamsbug -- great name for a very nice tea room.

Random graffiti that only makes sense because of the signs. Designed that way?

The boardwalk at Coney Island -- nicely done garbage cans (part of a school project?)


This is Alec -- a Street Guy. Found in Greenwich Village.

I love this one -- its in Williamsburg at Metropolitan Avenue.

Here's the subway in South Brooklyn viewed through a chain link fence. Just a little graffiti but the composition is street artish, no?


 

obeysmica-artsy1First of all Shepard Fairey’s exhibit at the ICA Boston is stunning visually, impressive politically and I want to see it again. Fairey is an artist of the streets who made it to the legit museum and gallery world. He  graphically shows us how confused we are. Guns and roses, life and death, love and hate  etc.

His arrest  on the way to his own opening over an old graffiti rap was stupid and put Boston in a bad light. The local cops apparently didn’t know that their acions would be picked up around the world and that they would seem odd to most people who care about art. Sure private property needs to be protected but Fairey’s deal is that he can appropriate private property, use it to communicate his own, highly worthwhile message and he seems to expect to usually get away with it (“art is what you can get away with” saith the Warhol).

Well, I get it. His street work is clever and intriguing so I guess if he doesn’t tag my house I’m ok with his methods ;>) Or to put it another way, urban public spaces are usually enhanced by graffiti of this caliber. I guess. Its a matter of taste and will always be controversial. 

Yeah but wait a minute — something strange happened on my way to the museum — Because I asked I was told that no photography of Shepard Fairey’s work would be permitted. In other words I couldn’t appropriate his stuff for, say my blog or even just to show my friends. Yet the brochure handed out at he museum said — “Know the words” — and the first word is “Appropriate!” Yep, that’s what Shepard does, but he doesn’t want any appropriations of his stuff. Is that fair or or does it even make sense?

So I only took one sneaky photo (see below). Also took some legit ones of the building and surroundings – shots of the architecture are ok according to the young man in black who sold us our tickets. (He was in black so he must be hip..)

ica-architecture

fairey-approriated1

It would be ironic to be arrested or kicked out for taking photos of Shepard Fairey’s work (which mostly have appropriated photos and other stuff in them) — know what I mean? What do you think?

(BTW — I pulled the ‘Obey’ tag from a random place on the internet. It is available world wide for your appropriation and delight!)

Use of photos

Photos on this blog are copyright protected. Therefore, if you wish to use photos please make a donation in an amount of your choice. My PayPal email address is fwinters@verizon.net.

Prints are available at Fine Art America

Or contact me directly.

Thanks.

Blog Stats

  • 296,287 hits

Categories Dropdown

Advertisements